SO LONG AND THANKS FOR ALL THE PROMPTS

It’s the closing day of Muri’s Poetry Month Challenge, and I’m down to the final prompt:  10. Write a Blitz poem

I saved this one for last because it’s my favorite.  Blitzing is quick and easy, with a minimum of rules.  In 2017, I led a poetry seminar at the public library.  I chose this as our class exercise because a Blitz can be completed handily in ten minutes, and it’s a stream of consciousness technique where writers spontaneously reveal a lot about themselves.
I insisted that the participants not erase, but simply go with whatever came to mind.  Reading their poem aloud was optional, but most did.  It’s a getting-to-know-you exercise far superior to the kind where you tell your name, where you’re from, and your occupation.  For the Blitz below, I began with the word spring. You don’t get to choose the title;
it is derived from specific words in the poem:  (the first word of Line 3) (preposition or conjunction) (the first word of line 47).  In this case, it was a very apt sign-off at the end of a super challenge.  Thanks, Muri!

TIME FOR GOOD-BYE

Spring has sprung
Springtime
Time to get up
Timepiece
Piece of cake
Piecemeal
Mealtime
Meal ticket
Ticket taker
Ticket to ride
Ride operator
Ride it out
Outside
Out of the loop
Loophole
Loop around
Around back
Around the bend
Bend me, shape me, any way you want me
Bendable
Able-bodied
Able to reach
Reach out
Reach for the stars
Stars in the sky
Stars in Hollywood
Hollywood couples
Hollywood Squares
Square meal
Square deal
Deal with it
Deal on the table
Table tennis
Tabletop
Top Dog
Top Gun
Gunmetal
Gunpoint
Point a finger
Point taken
Taken away
Taken for a ride
Ride into the sunset
Ride a wave
Wave crashing
Wave good-bye
Good-bye for now
Good-bye forever
Forever
Now

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ANYBODY NEED EMPTY HANGERS?

OK, Muri, economy of creativity can be pushed only so far.  We’re down to singlets now.  Because I am not a clothes-horse like you, I was a little distressed by this prompt:

12.  Write a list poem about clothes.

My closet is mostly empty.  I cannot imagine owning 87 jackets.  Heck, I can’t even imagine owning 87 pairs of very sensible underwear.  If I was to write a list poem about clothing I have loved, it would be very short:

Wide t-shirts
Sweatpants
The End

So, how about a list of clothing I have hated?  I’ve been hating clothing for a long time, so that would give me plenty of material to work with. I’m also channeling Dr. Seuss, so maybe that earns me a bonus point…

CLOTHING I HAVE HATED

Any kind of uniform
Shoes that pinch my toes
Slimy polyester tops
Tights and pantyhose

Midriff sweaters, button-flys
Stripes that go sideways
Anything “bedazzled”
Or from my sewing phase

Clingy t-shirts, dowdy skorts
Spandex undergarments
Pants without elastic waists
Jackets with faux pockets

Items knit from itchy wool
Ugly bridesmaid gowns
Things that have to be dry-cleaned
Or add ten extra pounds

With all the clothing I despise,
I wonder, honestly,
if I should chuck it all and join
a nudist colony

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WHAT’S THAT NOISE?

This poem combines just two of Muri’s prompts; it’s the best I can do considering what’s left.

2.  Write a poem about the changing seasons
7.  Write a Quatern

The following piece hums happily along as winter turns to spring.  It is
a “non-traditional” quatern—a few of the syllables are missing and the line that moves through the stanzas is close but not identical.  I have added internal rhymes just for fun.  What can I say?  Creativity doesn’t always stay within the lines.

APRIL ALL ABUZZ

Humming, humming, earth is humming
Soft vibrations wake creation
Dormant grass shoots up en masse
Greening blades in countless shades

Keen homeowners start their motors
Humming, humming, engines humming
Mowers growling, tillers plowing
Jostling beds of sleepyheads

Bulbs awaken, breaking open
From each womb, a brilliant bloom
Humming, humming, flowers humming
Pistils, stamens, sweet libations

Bold prospectors seeking nectar
smell perfume and zoom, zoom, zoom
from their hives in overdrive
Humming, humming, life is humming

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THREE FOR THREE, 4 PROMPTS LEFT

On her blog, A Different Perspective, my friend Murisopsis issued a challenge for National Poetry Month:  using the supplied prompts, in any order, write thirteen poems in 30 days, one poem each Monday, Wednesday and Friday in April.  The first week, I nailed three prompts with one poem; the second week, ditto.  Could I pull off this amazing feat a third time?  See for yourself!

4.  Write a concrete (shape) poem
5.  Write a poem about signs of spring
8.  Write four Haiku about favorite foods

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ANOTHER TRIPLE HEADER, MURI!

On her blog, A Different Perspective, my buddy Murisopsis laid down
a challenge for National Poetry Month: using the supplied prompts, in any order, write thirteen poems in 30 days (one poem each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday through the month of April).  The first week, I managed to nail three prompts with one poem.  It was so much fun, I decided to choose three more and try it again.

1.  Write a limerick
6.  Write a poem about dogs
9.  Write an acrostic poem using an emotion

Without further ado, here is my blissful acrostic limerick about dogs:

WALKING THE DOGS

Bold-nosed explorers are they
Lollygaggers at the odor buffet
In the grass, on a tree
Smelly poop, pungent pee
So strong I can’t pull them away

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THREE BIRDS WITH ONE POEM

On her blog, A Different Perspective, my friend Murisopsis laid down a challenge for National Poetry Month.  Hers is easier than some I’ve seen as it requires the completion of only three prompts per week, which are announced at the beginning and can be completed in any order.

MURI’S NATIONAL POETRY MONTH WRITING CHALLENGE

1. Write a limerick.
2. Write a poem about the changing seasons
3. Write a poem about angels (any kind).
4. Write a concrete (shape) poem.
5. Write a poem about signs of spring.
6. Write a poem about dogs.
7. Write a Quatern.
8. Write 4 haiku about favorite foods.
9. Write an acrostic poem using an emotion.
10. Write a Blitz poem.
11. Channel your inner Doctor (Seuss, Who, Frankenstein, Doolittle, Zhivago, McCoy… your choice)
12. Write a list poem about clothes
13. Write a poem using all of the following words: crow, sparrow, snow, chapeau, below, ginkgo, shallow, and solo.

The rules are simple.  Write 13 poems in 30 days (that comes out to one poem each Monday, Wednesday, and Friday throughout the month of April).  You may complete the prompts in any order.  Once written, post your poem on your blog and LEAVE MURI A COMMENT to let her know you have done so.  The point of the exercise is to have fun and stretch your poetic muscles.

OK, Muri, I figured I would start with the most difficult prompt, which I determined to be #13.  After I finished the poem, I realized it also fulfilled the criteria for #3 and #11.  So it may be a bit of a cheat, but here is my poem for Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of Week One:

BIRD FEEDER

The spinster next door
a disheveled old crow
pulls on her wool cap
the season’s chapeau

fills her pockets, dons
galoshes, sets off solo
trudging ‘n crunching
over late winter snow

Her size 9 footprints,
cocksure but shallow,
stop short at a bench
by a knobbled ginkgo

Birdseed is scattered
on the ground below,
one angel’s provision
for hungry sparrows

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