POEMS FOR WINTER SOLSTICE

LANTURNE seems the right form for this week; lantern-shaped verse to feed our longing for light as the days grow ever shorter.  A Lanturne has five lines, with a syllable count of 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 1.  Line 1 is a noun; line 5 is a synonym or metaphor of the noun.  According to some sources, the middle lines should describe the noun; others allow more carefree use of the syllables.

 

 

PICK ONE

Dime
smaller
than nickel
in Grandpa’s hand
Trick

 

THERAPY

Dog
Nosey
Attentive
Empathetic
Shrink

 

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10 thoughts on “POEMS FOR WINTER SOLSTICE

  1. Tippy Gnu December 2, 2018 / 9:23 am

    I wonder if the more rules you have to follow, the more difficult it is to write a poem. I like the “Pick One” poem. It’s true that the real little kids think that bigger is always better.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just Joan December 2, 2018 / 4:02 pm

      Thanks, Tippy. When I first started writing poetry, I assumed free verse was the easiest, but I actually find a few rules and a bit of structure helpful. Grandpa’s trick worked on me when I was 5 or so, kids always grab for the biggest coin, don’t they? I’m ready for it to stop being dark by 5 pm. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Tippy Gnu December 2, 2018 / 5:26 pm

        Yes, the early evenings can be a drag. Can’t wait until the 2nd Sunday of March.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Just Joan December 2, 2018 / 4:11 pm

      Thanks, PB. Yes, this one was harder to do than I thought when I picked it. Just coming up with a one-syllable word that has a one-syllable synonym was a challenge. And getting the shape right. But I like forms and rules, a basic framework for my words to stick to. 🙂

      Like

    • Just Joan December 4, 2018 / 11:22 am

      Yeah, Snoozin, the Lanturne is def more figurative than literal. Give it a few weeks, you’ll see the light. 🙂

      Like

  2. murisopsis December 3, 2018 / 10:55 pm

    I can so relate to the first one about the dime. My grandfather was an expert at sleight of hand. He could palm playing cards and pull quarters from your ears!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Just Joan December 4, 2018 / 11:31 am

      Thanks, Muri. Every Grandpa does that, I bet, excited when the light finally goes on over kid’s head and she realizes a small thing might have a greater value. My Grandpa didn’t do magic tricks, he preferred to fool us with dubious sayings, for instance, if you jumped up and down after Thanksgiving dinner, it would make enough room for dessert. Or that ice cream always fit because it melted and filled in the cracks. He loved to play cards (pinochle and euchre), always overbid his hand, and usually won anyway. 🙂

      Like

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